Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Delusional Living

Delusional Living
After reading and watching Death of a Salesman, I come to understand how someone’s realities can become distorted; the reality of past and present, the reality between truth and lies, and the reality of depression, anxiety, anger, and obsessive behavior. Willy Loman had expressed all of these from the beginning throughout the end of the play. Willy had a false perception that his son Biff could work for Bill Oliver and become a salesman like his father, however Biff didn’t agree with him and only seen himself as a thief and a stock boy. Biff seemed to lose all faith in himself after failing a math test, and lost all faith and respect for his father after finding him with another woman.
Willy had worked hard all of his adult life as a traveling salesman with very little to show for it. I really think the delusions, anger, anxiety, and depression really took a toll on Willy when he first lost his salary then lost his job all within a twenty four hour period. He realized that he wasn’t leaving a legacy behind, but two children that really couldn’t take care of themselves or their mother, and that he felt that he was a failure when it came to raising his children. So he created the delusion that if he committed suicide that the $20,000.00 insurance money would be enough for them and they would be okay. However, he didn’t think ( like many others who commit suicide) how their loved ones and friends are going to feel.
This play goes to show how we as parents want so much for our children, from accolades to achievements, from childhood to adulthood. Sometimes parents only see and hear what they want to when it comes to their children. As parents we work hard our whole life and want the absolute best for our children, but at what cost do we try to achieve this? Was obsessing or suicide the right answer for Willy, for his wife and children?

2 comments:

  1. In the first couple of sentences you start to touch on an interesting idea, that maybe Willie isn't even remembering his past correctly. He remembers himself as this athlete and then great salesman but was he ever? Are we dealing with an unreliable narrator whose gotten so deep into his own lies that now even he believes them? Maybe that's another reason why he's so unhappy, it's not that his boys aren't living up to his legacy, but actually they're just as mediocre as him.

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  2. "first lost his salary then lost his job all within a twenty four hour period" Corey, see Kayla's comment on Cory Robinson's post please.

    Eleanor, this is a great question! Miller convinces us that Willy is a tragic hero, but perhaps we shouldn't trust that perception any more than we should trust Willy's... This would be a great question to explore in one of our essays!

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